Career choices that
change the world

Introduction

It's time to act. It's time to take part in the green revolution. We all know that the current climate change crisis is really important, but did you know that it affects all of us? Go Green is here to teach you everything you need to know about the climate crisis, including the ways in which you can help, what our local councils are already doing and the green careers waiting for you.

999 CLIMATE
EMERGENCY

Human activity and behaviours are the main cause of climate change.

In the last 100 years the
earth’s average temperature has
increased faster than
previously before.

THIS IS GLOBAL WARMING

30% of the world’s population
is exposed to deadly heat
waves more than 20 days a year. 

2019 was the second hottest
year on record – Up by 1.1
degrees Celsius.

Use of fossil fuels like petrol, diesel,
gas and coal is the principal cause
of global warming.

Greenhouse gases produced
when we burn these fuels
contain a lot of carbon,
hence the term
‘carbon emissions’.

We need to reduce emissions by
7.6% every year from this
year to 2030.

Carbon dioxide makes up
two-thirds of all
greenhouse gases.

Communities, the environment, and
the economy will be badly affected.

Extreme weather is affecting our
health and wellbeing, and
impacting natural habitats.

The cost of living will
continue to increase, including
the cost of food, fuel
and insurance.

Did you know?

The government’s Green Jobs Taskforce has been set up with a goal to create 1,000 green jobs in our area! www.westyorks-ca.gov.uk/a-mayoral-combined-authority/mayoral-pledges/1000-green-jobs-in-west-yorkshire/

Did you know?

The new development of the Mayoral Green Jobs Gateway will provide 1,000 well-paid, skilled, green jobs for young people.

Want to learn more about green careers? Head to:
Green careers guide | British Council

GLOBAL CITIZENS UNITE

How you live your life can make an impact.

Lighting

Use LED bulbs rather than ones.

LED bulbs use at least 75% less energy than regular bulbs and last much longer. Replacing a 50W halogen with an LED could cut your energy costs by £75 over the lifetime of the bulb.

Rubbish

Make sure to recycle paper, plastic, newspaper, glass and aluminium cans.

Recycling a can uses less energy than making a new one. The energy you save could power your television for three hours.

Heating

Keep your home at the right temperature.

More than half of all the energy we use in our homes comes from heating and cooling. You can save 10-15% on your energy bill if you set your
thermostat to 18-21˚c in winter.

Shopping habits

Consider buying clothing from sustainable companies who use recycled materials.

85% of clothing ends up in landfill sites, adding to the carbon emissions caused by waste. By swapping clothing or buying from sustainable companies less waste is created.

Want to find out more about your future career options? Head to: nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/explore-careers

How you live your life can make an impact.

Lighting

Use LED bulbs rather than ones.

LED bulbs use at least 75% less energy than regular bulbs and last much longer. Replacing a 50W halogen with an LED could cut your energy costs by £75 over the lifetime of the bulb.

Rubbish

Make sure to recycle paper, plastic, newspaper, glass and aluminium cans.

Recycling a can uses less energy than making a new one. The energy you save could power your television for three hours.

Heating

Keep your home at the right temperature.

More than half of all the energy we use in our homes comes from heating and cooling. You can save 10-15% on your energy bill if you set your thermostat to 18-21˚c in winter.

Shopping habits

Consider buying clothing from sustainable companies who use recycled materials.

85% of clothing ends up in landfill sites, adding to the carbon emissions caused by waste. By swapping clothing or buying from sustainable companies less waste is created.

Want to find out more about your future career options? Head to: nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/explore-careers

SAVING THE WORLD:

JOBS
FOR THE FUTURE

SAVING THE WORLD:

JOBS
FOR THE FUTURE

Now you’ve thought about the small, everyday changes you can make to go green, let’s look at the bigger picture: green jobs.

What is a ‘green’ job?

A green job can be anything that supports the UK’s journey towards meeting environmental goals, such as lowering carbon emissions or restoring nature. This can be in any sector and match with any interest!

How do I get a green job?

The good thing about green jobs is that, because there are so many types in so many areas, there are different pathways you could follow to get into a job that can help save the world.

Apprenticeships

Apprenticeships allow you to ‘earn while you learn’ with a mix of classroom learning and paid work. They range from Level 3 (AS Level equivalent) up to Level 7 (masters/post graduate equivalent). They’re a great option if you know what area you want to work in and are keen to build your skills through hands-on experience.

There is a huge range of apprenticeship standards out there that could lead into a green job.

Some examples include:

Agriculture, Environmental
& Animal Care

  • Countryside ranger
  • Arborist
  • Fencing installer
  • Crop technician
  • Ecologist

Transport

  • EV technician
  • Bicycle mechanic
  • Rail and rail systems engineer
  • Road surface operative
  • Transport planner

Engineering & Manufacturing

  • Automation and controls engineering technician
  • Construction equipment maintenance technician
  • General welder
  • Metal fabricator

Digital

Health & Science

  • Environmental health practitioner
  • Research scientist
  • Food industry technical professional

Business, Administration & Procurement

Energy

  • Community energy specialist
  • Electrical power networks engineer
  • Gas network operative
  • Power network craftsperson

    Buildings & Retrofitting

    Other Construction

    • Groundworker
    • Structural steelwork fabricator
    • Geospatial survey technician
    • Civil engineering technician

    Protective Services

    Circular Economy & Recycling

    • Waste resource operative
    • Metal recycling general operative
    • Digital device repair technician

    Level 3 BTECs/Diplomas

    BTECs are practical courses that allow you to learn by doing. They are great for people who like to get hands-on and prefer coursework over exams.

    Examples of Level 3 BTECs related to green jobs include:

    Agriculture, Environmental
    & Animal Care

    • Advanced Technical Extended Diploma in Forestry and Arboriculture
    • Advanced Technical Extended Diploma in Agriculture
    • Certificate in Environmental Sustainability

    Buildings & Retrofitting

    • National Diploma in Construction and the Built Environment
    • Diploma In Thermal Insulation
    • NVQ Diploma in Roofing Occupations
    • Diploma for Designing, Engineering and Constructing a Sustainable
      Built Environment

      Digital

      • Diploma in Networking and Cybersecurity
      • Diploma in Computing
      • Diploma in Software Development
      • Certificate in Digital Engineering Design

      Energy

      • Diploma in Gas Engineering
      • Diploma in Gas Utilisation Installation and Maintenance:
        Water Heating and Wet Central Heating

      Engineering & Manufacturing

      A Levels

      A Levels are subject-based qualifications which allow you to learn about the theoretical side of a subject to a higher degree than at GCSE.

      There is an extensive list of A Level courses that can give you skills and knowledge needed for many green jobs, including:

      • Accounting
      • Architecture
      • Biology
      • Business
      • Chemistry
      • Design and Technology
      • Economics
      • Engineering
      • Environmental Science
      • Fashion and Textiles
      • Geography
      • Geology
      • Global Development
      • Law
      • Marine Science
      • Maths
      • Physics
      • Politics
      • Sociology

      Degrees

      You don’t have to go to university or get a degree to find a green job! In many cases you can go straight into a job after completing an apprenticeship or Level 3 course.

      If you do want to study a subject for longer before looking for a job, there are plenty of degrees out there that link to green jobs. For example:

      • BA in Business Studies
      • BSc in Engineering
      • BSc in Environmental Science
      • BA in Environmental Law
      • BSc in Geography
      • BSc in Health Sciences
      • BSc in Horticulture
      • BSc in Landscape Architecture
      • BSc in Marine Sciences
      • BA in Urban Planning

      Activity answer sheet

      Interested in any of these green careers and want to know more? Simply head to: nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/explore-careers

      SAVING THE WORLD:

      SKILLS
      FOR THE FUTURE

      Remember, a green job can be anything that supports the UK’s journey towards environmental goals. 

      Now that you’ve thought about the personal changes you can make to go green and studied some of the career options, it’s time to check out the key skills you’ll need to achieve in your future green career!

      Did you know?

      A career as an Ecologist would see you studying the connection between plants, animals and the environment. For this type of study, the soft skills curiosity and creativity are important.

      Becoming skill-ready!

      Together with any important qualifications needed for your chosen ‘green career’, you’ll also need to have a few skills, known as ‘transferrable skills’.

      Lots of people and employers are focusing on the skills required for greener jobs, rather than specific job titles that would be green. Those skills are the usual transferable skills we talk about!

      Transferable skills are personal attributes that enable you to work well with those around you and manage day-to-day tasks.

      Including: Empathy, social/emotional intelligence, judgement, design mind-set, sense-making, collaboration and communication.

      Want to learn more about green careers? Head to:
      Green careers guide | British Council

      Critical thinking

      Analysing
      Evaluating
      Making decisions
      Reflecting

      Creativity

      Problem-solving
      Questioning
      Making observations
      Experimenting

      Curiosity

      Researching
      Innovating
      Developing
      Enhancing knowledge

      Change management

      Adapting
      Empathising
      Supporting
      Taking ownership

      Collaboration

      Cooperating
      Teamworking
      Communicating
      Listening

      Did you know?

      The soft skills critical thinking and creativity are perfect for a career as a Smart Home Technician. This career includes fitting devices that help a homeowner control their heating, audio and electricity.

      Did you know?

      Becoming a Transport Planner involves a lot of tasks, including assessing infrastructure and analysing data. For a role like this, the soft skills change management and collaboration would come in extremely handy.

      Now that you’ve spent time understanding climate change and its impact , realised what makes a ‘green’ career and learned all about your own skills, it’s time to put your “greenest” foot forward and carry out your own research.

      Want to push yourself even further? Take a look at some of our other interactive resources specifically designed to help you refine and practise your soft skills, your CV writing ability and your interview technique.

      Virtual Work Experience - challenge yourself in a mock-interview and refine your interview skills.

      FutureGoals Remote - test your communication and planning skills, develop your creative thinking and challenge yourself to think outside of the box.

      Next Steps Toolkit - get to know your skills, learn more about your abilities and learn how to sell yourself to potential employers.

      ADVICE AND GUIDANCE FOR ADULTS

      With energy prices increasing and West Yorkshire’s declaration of a climate emergency, now is the perfect time to live a greener lifestyle. Becoming more energy-efficient and protecting our planet is on everyone’s agenda, across our entire region. But how can you be more green?

      MAYORAL PLEDGE

      Tackle the climate emergency and protect our environment.

      For more information, head to
      www.westyorks-ca.gov.uk/a-mayoral-combined-authority/mayoral-pledges/

      MAYORAL PLEDGE

      Created 1,000 skilled green jobs and make our region net-zero by 2038. We need to reduce emissions by 7.6% each year. This is at global level. Our regional 2038 net zero target requires us to go faster: 14.5% year on year.

      Why are these pledges?

      Employers need skilled workers to help make the changes needed to become a net zero carbon economy by 2038.

      The number of young people in employment dramatically dropped in the pandemic. Long-term unemployment for young people can make it even harder to get back into work and negatively impacts wellbeing.

      What is the mayor doing?

      The Mayor has set up a Green Jobs Taskforce to make recommendations in early 2023 about how to make best use of the opportunities that transitioning to a net zero economy in West Yorkshire will bring.

      For more information, head to
      www.westyorks-ca.gov.uk/a-mayoral-combined-authority/mayoral-pledges/1000-green-jobs-in-west-yorkshire/

      It’s important to understand how we use energy and how we can all make simple and often low or no-cost changes to reduce our energy consumption.

      Electrics

      Only fill your kettle with enough water for what you need. Boiling enough water for 1 cup will cost around 1p worth of energy.

      When you need to replace an electrical appliance, look for the highest energy efficiency rating you can afford. The most efficient rating is A down to G at the bottom.

      Switch off things like TVs at the plug rather than leaving them on standby. This could save you nearly £40 per year!

      Heating

      Check that your heating thermostat isn’t too close to an open window, cold spot or radiator.

      Install radiator valves around your home that allow you to control the temperature of each radiator. Don’t use a room very often? Turn off the radiator.

      You could turn your thermostat down by 1 degree and see if you notice the difference in your energy bills.

      Washing

      Wash your clothes at 30 degrees when you can and wait until you have a full load.

      Use your dishwasher when it is full and use an ECO setting if you have one.

      Dry your clothes outside where possible.

      Cooking

      Consider using a microwave where possible as they use far less energy.

      Ovens use a lot of energy. Consider using it to total capacity each time. Consider filling it and cooking a few meals together, then freezing or refrigerating for later on in the week.

      Induction hobs are a good swap for gas, especially as electricity is becoming greener – wind power etc.

      Home appliances

      While the bulk of energy is used to provide heating and hot water, our lighting systems and all the appliances we use add up too!

      The table below shows the typical amount of energy that some of the appliances we have at home use per hour or, where applicable, for 10 minutes.

      Buying energy-efficient appliances

      Making sure that the appliances you buy are energy efficient will not only save you money but also reduce your carbon footprint.

      What to look for…

      When choosing a new appliance, from a kettle to a microwave, make sure to check the energy label. The energy label tells you how much energy an appliance uses compared to similar products.

      To know which is the most energy-efficient (and the best for saving you money), simply look at the rating on a scale of A to G, with A being the most efficient product of its class and G being the least efficient.

      Did you know?

      A G-rated 265-litre fridge freezer could cost around £80 a year to run, whereas a larger 424-litre fridge freezer with a better F rating could cost about £90 a year to run.

      Heating your home

      Improving your heating system’s efficiency will help reduce your fuel bills and carbon emissions.

      Did you know?

      The average household generated 2,690kg of carbon dioxide (CO2) from space heating and hot water heating in 2020. By 2050, we need to reduce this to just 140kg per household.

      Boilers

      Heating and hot water account for over half of what you spend in a year on energy bills, so an efficient boiler makes a big difference.

      If it’s time to change your boiler, or if you’re thinking ahead for when it needs to be replaced, you’ll need to decide what type of heating system is right for you. Now might be the right time to switch to a low or zero-carbon emission heating system.

      Costs and savings

      Replacing a gas boiler

      The costs for replacing a boiler will vary, but a straightforward gas boiler replacement plus thermostatic radiator valves will typically cost about £4,000.

      Need help with replacing an old boiler?
      Check out www.betterhomesyorkshire.co.uk/new-boiler for more information about boiler replacement and the help available!

      Reducing home heat loss

      There are many simple yet effective ways to insulate your home, which can help to reduce heat loss while lowering your heating bills.

      Options include:

      Cavity wall insulation

      About a third of all the heat lost in an uninsulated home escapes through the walls. By properly insulating cavity walls, you will save energy and reduce your heating bill.

      Solid wall insulation

      Insulating your solid walls could reduce your heating bills. If your home was built before the 1920s, its external walls are probably solid rather than cavity walls.

      Floor insulation

      Insulating your ground floor is a great way to keep your property warm.

      Loft insulation

      A quarter of heat is lost through the roof in an uninsulated home. Insulating your loft or attic is an excellent way to reduce heat loss and heating bills.

      Draught proofing

      To draught-proof your home, you should block up gaps that let cold air in and warm air out. Saving warm air means you’ll use less energy to heat your home, save money, and make your home nice and cosy.

      Windows and doors

      If you currently have single glazed windows, you’re probably losing a lot of heat through them. Energy-efficient glazing covers both double and triple glazing. These are windows with two or more glass panes in a sealed unit.

      Did you know?

      Installing 270mm insulation in an uninsulated loft will save on
      average each year:

      £215 in a four-bed detached house
      £130 in a three-bed semi
      £115 in a three-bed mid-terrace
      £185 in a two-bed detached bungalow

      Retrofitting your home

      Carrying out improvements to your home is a perfect place to start on your journey to becoming greener. 

      What does it mean to Retrofit your home?

      Retrofit is simply the process of making changes to existing buildings so that energy consumption and emissions are reduced.

      Thinking about making changes? To find out what help is available in your area, simply head to: www.betterhomesyorkshire.co.uk/

      Your home’s energy performance

      The main reason for Retrofitting your home is to improve its energy performance. You might have heard of an EPC (energy performance certificate) before. This is something that every property has, and it looks at:

      ·       Total floor area
      ·       Property type
      ·       Walls
      ·       Secondary heating
      ·       Hot water
      ·       Main heating

      Giving a final energy rating score.

      This score can be improved with the right changes to your home – saving you money and saving the environment.

      An Energy Performance Certificate tells you how energy efficient your property is and gives it a rating from A (very efficient) to G (inefficient). It provides an estimate of the energy costs to heat and light your home and what its carbon dioxide emissions are likely to be.

      An EPC also includes information on what the energy efficiency rating could be if you made the improvements that are recommended. It also shows what these are typically likely to cost and what the savings are likely to be.

      How to get an EPC

      EPCs are a legal requirement whenever a property is built, sold or rented. If your home doesn’t already have an EPC, you’ll need to find a qualified, accredited assessor www.gov.uk/get-newenergy-certificate who will assess your property and produce the certificate. Costs vary and depend on the type and size of the property but usually start from around £60.

      Now’s the time to make green choices!

      Now you’ve got the right information, it’s time to make the right changes to your home! For more information on energy-saving home improvements, including government schemes and available funding, and to gain a better understanding of the region’s green pledges, simply head to:

      www.betterhomesyorkshire.co.uk/
      energysavingtrust.org.uk/
      www.westyorks-ca.gov.uk/a-mayoral-combined-authority/mayoral-pledges/

      How to Secure a Green Career

      With such a focus being placed on how to be greener, why not extend this focus to employment opportunities? You can make a positive impact on the environment at home and at work!

      Each job within the green sector allows you to make a difference in sustainability, conservation and the Earth. Whether you want to get your hands dirty or help in other ways, there are many career options out there for your specific skills.

      Here are a few examples of popular green careers:

      Recycle worker
      Environmental technician
      Wind turbine technician
      Water resources engineer
      Environmental scientist
      Energy Manager
      Civil engineer

      However, did you know that there are now even more careers that can benefit the environment, not just those that you’d expect?

      You may already possess the skills needed for a successful green career. The green sector needs a skilled workforce, including not only people who have scientific qualifications but also those who carry out traditional craft and technical jobs.

      Here are a few of the most popular skills needed for the green sector:

      Complex problem solving
      Communication
      Agricultural skills
      Planning
      Monitoring skills
      Science skills
      Resource management
      Financial skills
      Creativity